Home Health Warning: Tattoo ink can cause infection even 15 years later

Warning: Tattoo ink can cause infection even 15 years later

The doctor not just removed a lymph node from woman's armpit, they found a cluster of immune cells surrounded the black pigment.

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Australian doctors thought it was a  lymphoma cancer but they were shocked to see the woman’s enlarged lymph node under a microscope as instead of finding pigments of black tattoo from 15 years ago to which woman’s immune system was reaction just now. The doctors noticed the strange case, the case report was released on Monday in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine.

Warning: Tattoo ink can cause infection even 15 years later

The 30-year-old woman came to the doctor with small lumps presented under her arms, the lumps were there from about two weeks, she self-examined herself and found lumps under her arms. The body scan showed that she had, even more, enlarged lymph nodes in her body. The enlarged lymph was found in her chest, it was near her roots of lungs.

One of her doctor Dr. Christian Bryant who is a hematologist at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney said, “Ninety-nine times out of 100, (this) will be lymphoma.”

Lymphomas is one of cancer which develops from immune cells, it also lead lymph nodes to swell. Infection and inflammation may cause Lymph nodes to enlarge.

The recent case of Australian woman (her name kept unveiled), due to inflammation her lymph nodes were reacting to her old tattoo ink. However, there was no role of cancer cells.

Australian doctors successfully removed a lymph node from her armpit which she noted 2 weeks ago. The doctor not just removed a lymph node from her armpit, they found a cluster of immune cells surrounded the black pigment. The woman had a large black ink tattoo that was 15-year-old covering her back, the another black-ink tattoo was 2.5-year-old on her left shoulder.

The director of cosmetic dermatology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Dr. Bill Stebbins who had no role in the report said, “The skin has its own immune cells that are always surveilling the skin.”

Stebbins said, “The pigment is too large for these cells to eat and digest.”

“That’s why they’re still there many years later.”

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