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Motherhood may make woman’s cells older even more than obesity & smoking

The woman who had given birth to a baby has a 4.2 percent shortage of telomeres than those who had not given birth to children yet.

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Motherhood changes a woman’s body in many ways. It is also a time period when a woman’s body faces a lot. Giving birth to a child changes up woman’s body and mind in different manners, but these changes are higher than it is concluded before.

Motherhood may make woman's cells older even more than obesity & smoking
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The study of DNA collected from 2,000 pregnant women in the US tells that those who had given birth has an older cell age.

Anna Pollack who is an epidemiologist at George Mason University says,”We were surprised to find such a striking result.” Pollack says,”It is equivalent to around 11 years of accelerated cellular ageing.” Pollack with her team worked on the data collected from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), that is a study worked on the health of people in the US since long.

Motherhood may make woman's cells older even more than obesity & smoking
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When the researchers studied the data collected from 1990 and 2002, they found something unusual and marked a genetic marker that called telomeres.

Telomeres works as caps on chromosomes, that helps to protect the genetic information in the cells that will not get deteriorating over time and keeps the harmful things away from us.

In the study, researchers found that besides all the terms like age, education, ethnicity, smoking and many more, the woman who had given birth to a baby has a 4.2 percent shortage of telomeres than those who had not given birth to children yet.

The average meant shows a difference of 116 fewer base pairs in the woman who had borne children that is equal to 11 years of accelerated cellular aging. The surprising fact is that this telomere¬†shortening in those who had given birth is more than smoking and obesity. Pollack says,”We found that women who had five or more children had even shorter telomeres compared to those who had none, and relatively shorter relative to those who had one, two, three or four, even.”

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