Home Entertainment Host and co-creator of ‘Let’s Make a Deal’ Monty Hall dies at...

Host and co-creator of ‘Let’s Make a Deal’ Monty Hall dies at 96

Hall died from the f heart failure on Saturday at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif, his daughter Sharon said. "Let's Make a Deal"  game show had become a Television staple, it was first aired in 1963 on NBC as a daytime show.

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Monty Hall who is popularly known as the host and co-creator of the game show named “Let’s Make a Deal” has died on Saturday. He has died at the age of 96.

Host and co-creator of 'Let's Make a Deal' Monty Hall dies at 96

Hall died from the f heart failure on Saturday at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif, his daughter Sharon said. “Let’s Make a Deal”  game show had become a Television staple, it was first aired in 1963 on NBC as a daytime show. The had been aired in prime time for around next 40 years. The had been aired in two brief outings and in syndication with the other hosts.

An episode of the show named “The Odd Couple” that featured Tony Randall (Felix Unger) and Jack Klugman (Oscar Madison) as the bickering guests on the game show hosted by Hall.

The game show’s contestants were chosen amongst the studio audience — wearing fancy dresses of clowns, cartoons and animals in order to draw host’s attention towards them.

“Do you want Door No. 1, No. 2 or No. 3?” had become the famous phrase of the game show, which had also allowed contestants to try their luck and winning a new car. The game show winning prize could be anything including a new car or worthless item.

Hall who always appeared as the super active, energetic and quick thinking person is mentioned as the perfect host in the reference book of Alex McNeil, ‘Total Television.’

McNeil wrote: “Monty kept the show moving while he treated the outrageously garbed and occasionally greedy contestants courteously; it is hard to imagine anyone else but Hall working the trading area as smoothly.”

Hall was used to easily interact with the people. On the PBS documentary series named ‘Pioneers of Television,’ he said, “I’m a people person.”

He said, “And so I don’t care if they jump on me, and I don’t care if they yell and they fainted — those are my people.”

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